Tag: Shakespeare (page 1 of 3)

Antony & Cleopatra @ The Royal Shakespeare Theatre

Josette Simon and Antony Byrne.
Photo by Helen Maybanks

After the heated political tension of Julius Caesar, the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Rome season continues with a foray into Egypt for Antony & Cleopatra. The mood here is, initially at least, much lighter than the previous visit to Mark Antony but there are still tensions in Rome! Continue reading

Julius Caesar @ The Royal Shakespeare Theatre

Andrew Woodall as Caesar.
photo by Helen Maybanks

It’s an accepted cliché that, whatever the prevailing political mood there is a Shakespeare play that adequately reflects, comments on or holds a mirror up to it. Like all the best clichés it has become so ingrained in the consciousness of theatregoers because it is largely true. Thus at a time when we worry about the power of world leaders like Trump and the ability of political parties with extremist views to gain momentum Julius Caesar seems incredibly apt. Continue reading

The Tempest @ The Royal Shakespeare Theatre

the-tempest-production-photos_-2016_-press-call_2016_photo-by-topher-mcgrillis-_c_-rsc_207549There’s no better way to kick the post-Christmas blues than an early January trip to the theatre, so this year we decided to go an extra step and head to Stratford upon Avon for a short break. Of course, when you’re in Stratford you’d be mad to miss a trip to the Royal Shakespeare Company so we booked well in advance to see The Tempest. Continue reading

King Lear @ The Barbican Centre

Photo by Ellie Kurttz (c) RSC

Photo by Ellie Kurttz (c) RSC

For many actors Lear is the ultimate role, hence the proliferation of productions that appear every year. In 2016 alone we’ve had Timothy West, Don Warrington and Michael Pennington all pop up in the role and Glenda Jackson is currently giving us a female perspective over at the Old Vic. RSC stalwart Antony Sher’s take on the role has been something we’ve been waiting a few years for… so how does he do? Continue reading

Love’s Labours Lost/Much Ado About Nothing @ Chichester Festival Theatre

the company of Much Ado About Nothing

the company of Much Ado About Nothing

There’s something special about seeing a Shakespeare play for the first time – so the chance to see two, on the same day and in linked productions couldn’t be missed. A couple of years ago the Royal Shakespeare Company paired Love’s Labours Lost with Much Ado About Nothing (renamed Love’s Labours Won) in a gorgeous setting amidst the Great War to much acclaim. This year they’ve revived the production, with many of the original cast and have brought it to Chichester Festival Theatre. Continue reading

Imogen @ Shakespeare’s Globe

Photo: Tristram Kenton

Photo: Tristram Kenton

Cymbeline has long been regarded as perhaps the most challenging of Shakespeare’s “problem plays”, a hodge-podge of plots thrown together without any consistency of tone or style – it’s almost like a series of sketches more than a coherent play. It’s normally best presented as comedy or fairy tale, but this gritty new production decides to dwell in the earthiness of the character’s relationships. Continue reading

WATCH: The RSC present their trailer for Cymbeline

Cymbeline_PosterI was lucky enough to see the Royal Shakespeare Company‘s production of Cymbeline in Stratford back in May and, for a play that has always seemed troublesome, it made for incredibly engaging viewing in large part due to a stunning cast of performers and a fascinating setting. Check out the trailer here and then go see it for yourself, it transfers to the Barbican later this year. Continue reading

The Two Gentlemen Of Verona @ New Theatre Royal, Portsmouth

The Two Gentlemen of Verona.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona in it’s natural outdoor setting

Shakespeare’s early plays are often problematic, with the bawdier comedies such as The Comedy of Errors the faults are hidden within some gloriously silly slapstick, but in The Two Gentlemen Of Verona (quite possibly the first play in Will’s canon) the flaws are writ large. Nonetheless Shakespeare’s Globe’s gloriously silly touring production makes for a largely enjoyable evening. Continue reading

Macbeth @ Shakespeare’s Globe

tumblr_inline_o9a2klSlSK1rgiv1h_500Like most of Shakespeare’s tragedies Macbeth works best when viewed on the strength of the relationships between its characters. Sure the blood and guts murders are ways to get bum on seats but even with a literal thunderstorm overhead foreshadowing the tumultuous effects of Macbeth’s actions it all boils down to a marriage made strong by the pursuit of power. Continue reading

A Midsummer Night’s Dream @ Shakespeare’s Globe

tumblr_inline_o8o55a4HhG1rgiv1h_500Anarchy!

It’s not what you expect from a Shakespeare play… even one that has been performed in as many ways as A Midsummer Night’s Dream has been tackled.Emma Rice’s debut piece in her first season as Artistic Director for the Globe throws the rulebook right out of the window though with performers wearing head mics, set dressing seemingly hanging from the sky and a distinctly non-reverential approach to William’s words. Continue reading

Older posts